Theravāda Buddhism Web Directory

Charleston

A comprehensive introduction to the life and teachings of the Buddha according to the Theravadin School.

California

A Taste of Salt draws 350 pages containing the central teachings of the Buddha from the roughly 5,000 pages of the Sutta Pitaka. The purpose of this collection is to make these essential texts more accessible to meditators and students of Buddhism.

New Mexico

Travel Guide to the Buddha’s Path

by Eric K. Van Horn

The Buddha’s training in conduct, meditation and understanding.

An outline of the teachings of the Buddha in the words of the Pali Canon, compiled, translated, and explained by Nyanatiloka.

Charleston

A new rendering of the Dhammapada in English by Allan R. Bomhard.

Talks of Ven. Pemasiri Thera with his student David Young about practical aspects of Buddha Dhamma at the Sumathipàla Na Himi Dhama Center in Kanduboda (Sri Lanka).

Complete book in PDF format: http://dhamma.ru/sadhu/lib/Mango Tree Wisdom.pdf

See also: Affectionate Splendour: Taking refuge with Pemasiri Thera

 

The site for everything about Buddhism in Sri Lanka. Tipitaka, lessons in Pali, Dhamma articles in English and Sinhala, extensive listings of viharas and meditation centres.

 

See also the mirror of Mettanet Tipitaka at: http://vimuttimag.ga/tipitaka/

Dhammapada verses with stories of occasions when they have been uttered by the Buddha, in the translation of Daw Mya Tin.

Dhammapada or way of Righteousness, is the name of one of the canonical books of the Buddhist sacred scriptures. It is written in the Pali language. It consists of 423 stanzas. These are reputed to be the very words of Buddha. The Dhammapada commentary (in Pali Dhammapad-Attha-katha) is ascribed to Buddhaghosa, the greatest of all the Buddhist scholastics. This ascription is without due warrant, as appears from translator's introduction. The commentary purports to tell us "where, when, why, for what purpose, with reference to what situation, with reference to what person or persons," Buddha uttered each one of these stanzas. In so doing, the author of the commentary narrates 299 legends or stories. These stories are the preponderating element of the commentary, and it are these which are here translated.

Translated from the original Pāli text of the Dhammapada Commentary by Eugene Watson Burlingame, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; sometime Harrison Fellow for Research, University of Pennsylvania, and Johnston Scholar in Sanskrit, Johns Hopkins University; Lecturer on Pāli (1917-1918) in Yale University.

See also: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=Burlingame%2C%20Eugene%20Watson%20AND%20mediatype%3Atexts