Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы

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Mirko Fryba (Ven. Ayukusala)

Practice of Happiness: Exercises and Techniques for Developing Mindfulness, Wisdom and Joy

Strategies of Ecstasy

page 111

Concentration with Composure

Concentration is based on the enjoyment that is connected with the subsiding of wanting. Two principles are important for the accomplishment of concentration: first, granting ourselves the possibility of dwelling on what is dear to us; second, skillfully dealing with distractions and disturbances. To do both, we must be left in peace. Then we can give our attention more and more to happiness-furthering objects of concentration, such as mindfulness of breathing and radiating kindness, and let them become dear to us.

Before we consider suitable objects of concentration in greater detail, let us ask ourselves what composure really is. In organizing this book, I have adopted the strategy of leaving you, the reader, in peace and always respecting your right for self-determination. If there is anything I question, it is the idea that you ought to become different from how you are. Perhaps you recall that you were able to develop best when your parents and teachers left you the choice of being the way you wanted to be. In those times, you flourished and as a result were able to open yourself. Free from interference, you opened yourself to receive what was offered to you. Because of this, it is my conviction that what is offered in this book will also be best received if it remains up to you to take what is helpful to you, what grows dear to you because your unforced attention turns toward it. That constitutes your composure with regard to this book and lets you happily concentrate as you read it.

When, more than ten years ago, I asked my teacher Nyanaponika Thera how, in the advanced stages of concentration, to get rid of unwanted perceptions that distract one from the unwanted perceptions that distract one from the meditative object, he replied: “You don't get rid of anything. The mind concentrates itself on what interests it when it is left in peace.” Then he had me think about the example of a child who is so absorbed in playing with a toy train that he does not even hear his mother's voice when she calls him to come and eat. At that time, I had been involved for months with the introspective analysis of mental processes that take place during the onset of meditative absorption and had made a fairly great effort to understand them conceptually. This led to my temporarily losing the ability to attain the higher stages of concentration in my meditation.  Only when I once more left my experiential process in peace, left off making it an object of investigation, did I once again find the composure to enjoy concentration. I then only continued my analytical investigation when observing children at play.

I will come back later to some discoveries I made in this connection. Let us provisionally sum up the moral of this story with the following formulation: The composure necessary for concentration consists in part in leaving oneself in peace.

In order to attune ourselves to an object of concentration that is dear to us, all distractions must leave us in peace. You have probably noticed by now in reading along that “letting be” is always emphasized in connection with concentration. This is intentional, because I am trying here to make available the insight that we cannot create concentration. We can let concentration happen by letting ourselves enjoyably dwell on the subject of concentration. How do we create this possibility? Certainly not by fighting off the distractions, because the rejected and suppressed distractions, in reaction, exercise a kind of  counter-pressure as soon as suppression leaves off – and we cannot concentrate as long as we have to keep suppressing distractions. The only help here is dealing with the distractions skillfully. This leads to detachment of the mind from disturbances.

page 117

Transforming Distractions into Supports of Concentration

In reading an important newspaper article as well as during the meditation exercise, concentration can get lost by being distracted by nearby beings. We have already talked about dealing with distractions in connection with the exercise in mindfulness of body (at the end of chapter 2) and kindness meditation (in chapter 3). The procedure there was, first, simply to label the disturbance and return immediately to the main object of mindfulness and, second, to use the disturbance as a secondary object of meditation, as for example, in apprehending the elements. We did not treat the distortions of kindness, compassion, and sympathetic joy explicitly as distractions, but rather termed them 'near enemies/ Probably it occurred to you even then that the ' near enemies' (for example, frivolous good humor) actually might function as preliminary stages of the pure form not yet attained (for example, calm sympathetic joy). Thus an enemy can be made into a helper or harbinger. At this point let us discuss this principle more technically and in greater depth.

Let us carry on with the example of the newspaper article. The page of a newspaper bearing many sensational headlines lies in front of me. I pick out the headline of an article that interests me, I have shielded myself from gross disturbances and prepared myself—through the use of a technique I know — for some concentrated. I am composed and I have time. I allow myself the time and do not let myself bothered about it. Once more I leaf through the whole newspaper and conclude that there is really nothing interesting in it. Then I return to the chosen article.

The newspaper page with the article I have chosen is in front of me, and I know: “This is the most interesting one.” Nevertheless, I shift my gaze back immediately in the direction of my chosen article and comment mentally: “But his is more interesting!” and stay with this for a few seconds. Then I glance again at the other neighboring article and acknowledge: “This is also interesting,” but go back again immediately to the chosen article and say to myself softly with the emphasis: “Yes! This is more interesting!” I continue in this way deliberately to distract my attention from the object of concentration, but each time immediately going back to the chosen one, because it is more interesting. Of course it could happen that during this process my gaze shifts unexpectedly away from the newspaper altogether, onto an open box of candy (a bowl of fruit, a package of cigarettes) on the table, and immediately the intention almost arises to reach out my hand for a piece of candy (an apple, a cigarette). . . . However, I know: “There are so many interesting articles here in front of me” and let my gaze come back to the newspaper page. And now the technique I learned before spontaneously comes into play: Clearly knowing the purpose, I let my glance come back to the newspaper page. Once there again, I yield to my reinforced tendency to give my attention to what interests me the most.

page 120

Did you take so much pleasure in your deepened understanding that you stayed fully concentrated on this mental content without interruption? Or did you perhaps feel from the beginning an aversion or even anger at “having to” read the whole chapter again? If that is the case, there is some lack of composure. Or did you completely reject the invitation to reread? Did you notice alterations in your state of mind: inquisitive openness, blunt rejection, swinging back and forth between different spheres of experience?

What does your mind tend forward, at what point does it flow all together as one?

Objects of Meditation: The Gates to Ecstasy

The beginning of the way to ecstatically concentrated awareness was shown through the example of concentrated reading of a newspaper article. We are acquainted with the right means for bringing about ecstasy from concentration. Diagram 5 synoptically illustrates how distractions can be reworked into preliminary stages of concentration, to wit, by the same trick we used with reading the newspaper. The technique encloses the inevitable fluctuations of attention in a circle in such a way that gross deviations are forestalled. In this way, awareness is separated from the more distant manifoldness of things. According to the definition of ecstatic concentration introduced at the beginning of the chapter, it requires detachment (viveka) from manifoldness so that concentration can be intensified into one-pointedness (citta-ekaggatā); also, dwelling on the object of concentration should be accompanied by a feeling of happiness (sukha).

Concentration achieved by means of repression of distractions and without an accompanying feeling of  happiness would not be a concentration leading to ecstasy. Such a tense and loveless concentration would not even allow effective comprehension of a newspaper article. Unfortunately, such a way of looking at concentration is all too widespread. Taking this approach, for example, school psychologists, psychiatrists, teachers, and childcare personnel try to suppress obstacles to concentration and get children painfully to give up their spontaneous interest in things by the most diverse means. They know nothing about affection toward the object of concentration, nothing about detachment and composure. They do not know that the so-called obstacles to concentration are in fact healthy reactions of a mind defending itself against violations by boring, wrongly conveyed, and meaningless material. Not only newspaper-reading and meditation, but also learning, traveling, discussing, playing, and working can be ecstatically experienced and enjoyed.

The ecstatic experience is characterized by the even flow of a feeling of well-being (sukha).

page 124

Stages of Concentration

The complete absorption of jhāna is characterized by an undisturbed unity of experience. Technically this means that there is only one object present in consciousness and all mental formations like noticing, concentration, will, joy, and so forth are in equipoise and flowing evenly. Such a harmonization is the result of a painstaking labor of mindfulness in which, through frequent repetition, skills for accomplishing the transitions between states of consciousness are trained. By progress in practice the meditator is able to discover technical tricks within the process and to apply them appropriately.

For the sake of illustration, let us once more compare meditative concentration to a child playing with a toy train. With the help of an adult (here parallel to meditation teacher), the child first learns simply to lay a circle of track and to put locomotive on it - that is, to establish the meditative object and direct mindfulness toward it. This corresponds to the stage of preparatory concentration (pari-kamma-samādhi). This is the level on which a beginner's meditation takes place. Though the beginner remains concentrated on the meditative object alone throughout the session, his meditation is characterized by many distractions and discoveries that are not part of the unitary image of the primary object. With time the child learns to round out his game to a greater level of completeness and at the same time to neutralize the events of the outside world so they will not cause interruptions. Continuous time spent in playing with the train is extended by perceiving any external events – such as the mother bringing something to drink or a piece of furniture having to be moved in order to extend the track – as a useful part of the game. During periods of meditation when, in a similar way, the primary object is held at the peak of the hierarchy of attention (aggatā), we may speak of a “neighboring concentration” (upacāra-samādhi).

Only when no more changes are taking place on the peripheries of the meditative object and no things neighboring on the meditative object are drawing attention to themselves – only at that point, a new experiential space opens up that is completely filled with a single object of consciousness. This is full concentration (appanā-samādhi). I the experiential sphere of meditation, full concentration goes together with the harmonization of all mental formations (saṅkhāra-upekkhā). Without any longer having to control outer or inner disturbances, we enjoy the even flow of awareness. Only the most elementary forms of thinking are still necessary in order to apprehend the reality-anchoring impressions of the meditation objects (vitakka) and to administer the inner household (vicāra). Joy (pīti) keeps interest in continuing alive, and the feeling of calming, pleasant freedom from care (sukha) strengthens the one-pointedness of mind (citta-ekaggatā), which shuts out (viveka) perceptions from other spheres of experiencing. This is the full concentration of meditative absorption (jhāna), which goes beyond ecstasy of the sensuous world (kāma-bhava).

We must be clear here that it is no more possible to convey such an experience by means of a description than it is, for example, to convey color perception to someone who has been born blind; and indeed, we are usually born without the experience of jhāna. Thus perhaps we will get a better idea if, with the help of clear comprehension of the sphere of experiencing (gocara), we try to understand ecstatic concentration through the example of the child playing. The child is functioning in the experiential sphere of family life, and playing with trains is part of the manifoldness of this sphere – just as meditation exercises are part of the manifoldness of the sphere of training in Dhamma strategies. Within this manifoldness, the child shows preference toward those things that help him to prepare for an intensive play. While playing, he concentrates his perception in such a way that does not touch on his game. However, the paths of transition between the experiential sphere of family life and that of the game remain open; it is just that whatever is connected with playing the train is favored. However, from the moment when the world of trains is established and the child's interest is fully given over to the functions of train traffic, all other spheres of experiencing disappear. As long as there are no disturbances, the ecstatic train journey continues alone or, who knows, perhaps in interaction with new companions whose natural habitat is the sphere of ecstasy. This metaphor could be pursued further into the investigative sphere concerned with the psycho-cosmology of gods and demons who dwell in the worlds accessible by means of meditative objects. For the development of Dhamma strategies, however, such a geography of psychotope is less important than the development of skills that assure our competence in all spheres of experiencing and especially in making transitions between them.
« Последнее редактирование: 15:44 26 Марта 2013 от Ассаджи »
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Re: Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы
« Ответ #1 : 10:08 12 Января 2013 »

Venerable Prof. Āyukusala Thera:
Pañca Vasiyo, Five Masteries (of Meditation as well as of Any Job)

Видео - http://www.ayurama.eu/ayu_avi/#en

http://www.ayurama.eu/pdf/5vasiyo_lecture.pdf
« Последнее редактирование: 13:54 10 Февраля 2018 от Ассаджи »
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Re: Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы
« Ответ #2 : 10:13 12 Января 2013 »

Практика касин

Видео - http://www.ayurama.eu/ayu_avi/#en
(текст - http://www.ayurama.eu/pdf/dibbaviharaayu.pdf )

Медитация при ходьбе - http://www.ayurama.eu/ayu_avi/#en
« Последнее редактирование: 21:45 23 Марта 2019 от Ассаджи »
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Page 141

During the exercise, sit erect, relaxed, and comfortable so that you have the blue disk three to five feet in front of you, not too low and no higher than your head. The perception of the blue disk, to which—without effort, sitting comfortably and calmly—you turn your attention, is called parikamma-nimitta, the "preparatory image." The process at this stage of the exercise is similar to that illustrated in Diagram 5 (page 119). Speaking softly to yourself, label the inner arisings and clearly comprehended that the perception of the blue disk is the most interesting and rewarding one at this time. If your eyes become tired, this is a sign that you have been looking in a way that was not entirely composed and relaxed. In such a case, close your eyes for a while and recover your composure—for example, by means of mindfulness of breathing. If you feel heavy and lethargic, then it is a good idea to check your sitting posture, sit up straight, and possibly stretch your arms above your head with a deep inbreath a few times. Then go back to the meditative object. If the preparatory image begins to shimmer or changes in other ways, this only means that the mind is a bit agitated. Calm yourself again with a few minutes of mindfulness of breathing or, if you cannot do it sitting up, practice sayana for a while. There should be no changes in the preparatory image (parikamma-nimitta); the most that is allowable is that with time it can become clearer and more vivid.
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syugyosya

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Спасибо. Буду пробовать. А что за диаграмма на странице 119?
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Вот эта диаграмма.
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Этот подход напоминает "формирование исцеляющей воронки" Питера Левина:

http://healthy-back.livejournal.com/271330.html#transformation
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Re: Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы
« Ответ #7 : 14:48 26 Октября 2016 »

For the sake of illustration, let us once more compare meditative concentration to a child playing with a toy train. With the help of an adult (here parallel to meditation teacher), the child first learns simply to lay a circle of track and to put locomotive on it - that is, to establish the meditative object and direct mindfulness toward it. This corresponds to the stage of preparatory concentration (pari-kamma-samādhi). This is the level on which a beginner's meditation takes place. Though the beginner remains concentrated on the meditative object alone throughout the session, his meditation is characterized by many distractions and discoveries that are not part of the unitary image of the primary object. With time the child learns to round out his game to a greater level of completeness and at the same time to neutralize the events of the outside world so they will not cause interruptions. Continuous time spent in playing with the train is extended by perceiving any external events – such as the mother bringing something to drink or a piece of furniture having to be moved in order to extend the track – as a useful part of the game. During periods of meditation when, in a similar way, the primary object is held at the peak of the hierarchy of attention (aggatā), we may speak of a “neighboring concentration” (upacāra-samādhi).

Only when no more changes are taking place on the peripheries of the meditative object and no things neighboring on the meditative object are drawing attention to themselves – only at that point, a new experiential space opens up that is completely filled with a single object of consciousness. This is full concentration (appanā-samādhi). In the experiential sphere of meditation, full concentration goes together with the harmonization of all mental formations (saṅkhāra-upekkhā). Without any longer having to control outer or inner disturbances, we enjoy the even flow of awareness. Only the most elementary forms of thinking are still necessary in order to apprehend the reality-anchoring impressions of the meditation objects (vitakka) and to administer the inner household (vicāra). Joy (pīti) keeps interest in continuing alive, and the feeling of calming, pleasant freedom from care (sukha) strengthens the one-pointedness of mind (citta-ekaggatā), which shuts out (viveka) perceptions from other spheres of experiencing. This is the full concentration of meditative absorption (jhāna), which goes beyond ecstasy of the sensuous world (kāma-bhava).

Упасака Чуладаса приводит подобное описание:

Attention, Awareness and the Problem of Mind Wandering

Let’s look at how attention and awareness work together in the familiar experience of mind-wandering. We sit down to meditate, placing our attention on the breath. But very quickly some thought captures our attention, such as a childhood memory of being at the beach. Then, a whole sequence of associated thoughts unfolds and, before you know it, we’re planning our next vacation to the Bahamas—even seeing the color of the mini-umbrella in our drink as we sit by the ocean.

What happened here? Basically attention got caught and dragged through a sequence of thoughts, and awareness has collapsed. That is, as attention went on vacation, our awareness of where we are (the meditation hall), what we wanted to do (attend to the breath), and why (to awaken for the sake of all beings) has faded.

Now, think about that critical moment when we suddenly realize the mind was wandering. Maybe we’ve been fantasizing for two, three, or even 10 minutes, but at some point we abruptly “wake up” to the fact that we’re no longer doing what we had intended to—pay attention to the breath. Notice how this moment is not under our conscious control. “You” didn’t make it happen, it just happened. It’s like when we suddenly remember a phone call we forgot to make or an un-mailed check—the thought just pops into our head.

This “wake up” call is actually another function that awareness performs; as attention hones in, awareness keeps watch and signals to attention when it’s gone off track. Awareness acts like an alert system, informing us when there is a divide between what we wanted to do (watch the breath) and what we’re actually doing (thinking about the Bahamas).

When awareness does inform us of mind-wandering, our natural tendency is to quickly return to the breath, often forcefully and with self-judgment. Every meditation teacher will tell you this is a bad idea. They’ll also tell you to return with gentleness and appreciation. But why? Because, by valuing this moment, you’re training the mind through positive reinforcement to become aware more quickly in the future. In other words, by taking a moment to enjoy and appreciate waking up from mind-wandering, by cherishing our mini-epiphany, we train awareness to alert us sooner and more frequently.

On the other hand, to become annoyed or self-critical at this moment is like scolding awareness for doing its job. We end up discouraging the very process that stops mind-wandering. It’s like telling awareness we don’t want to interrupt the mind-wandering.

Training the mind in meditation is like training a pet. Consistent, immediate positive reinforcement of behaviors we want is far more effective than punishing behaviors we don’t. As we keep repeating this technique, awareness will eventually intervene before attention completely forgets the meditation object. Over time, awareness will grow so strong that it’s always present, and you’ll never lose the meditation object as your focus of attention.

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2015/08/attention-awareness-how-to-meditate-successfully/
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Re: Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы
« Ответ #8 : 14:50 26 Октября 2016 »

It is quite possible to be observing your own mind in peripheral awareness at the same time that attention is focused on something else, like a conversation. When you do this, it gives you the feeling of "watching the mind" even while the mind is engaged in carrying on the conversation, or whatever else it is that attention happens to be engaged in. In other words, two ways of knowing, happening at the same time, provide the "mirror". It allows the mind's activities to be illuminated from "behind", or "within" or "above", or however you might like to describe it.

It takes practice to get good at doing this. And being grounded in body awareness is a great way to get into this place. But no amount of practice and skill will get you very far in intense emotional situations, because attention sucks up all of your capacity for consciousness, leaving none behind for peripheral awareness. This is where meditation really helps. The mind becomes more powerful, so, providing you have developed the habit of introspective peripheral awareness, you are able to mindful even in situations where you might otherwise not be.

The reason that some of us have acquired this skill at sustaining peripheral awareness and this enhanced conscious power of the mind is that we have been using it all along to help us succeed in our meditation. Early on, we noticed that when we became too focused, we either forgot what we were doing or we got dull and dozy. So we learned to avoid becoming hyper-focused by sustaining peripheral awareness while we focused. Then, the way we ultimately overcame dullness and distractions was by recognizing them as soon as they arose so that we could correct for them. And we did this by converting our peripheral awareness into introspective awareness so that we always knew what was happening in our minds. Eventually, not only introspective peripheral awareness, but the correcting process itself became automatic, and we were good meditators as a result. But sustained introspective peripheral awareness as a habit spills over into daily life as well. So we also found ourselves being much more mindful, even while working and talking to people and fighting with our partners. This was, of course, a tremendous bonus, and actually leads to Insight.

Those of us who have acquired this skill and ability have done it largely by accident. I know that my own successes in both meditation and life would have come about much more quickly if someone had explained these details to me. So that is why I am so happy to pass it along to you. Cultivate peripheral awareness both on and off the cushion. learn to sustain peripheral awareness even when you are focusing very closely. Transmute peripheral awareness from being all about what is happening outside of the mind to being about what is happening inside the mind as well. Then you can:

1. Apply your attention fully to the conversation (or other activity), while at the same time
2. Remaining grounded in the present circumstances, aware of your body, and aware of what is going on in your mind - i.e. what you are feeling and doing or saying or thinking, why you are doing or saying or thinking it, and whether or not it is really what you want to be doing or saying or thinking. In other words, clear comprehension, rooted in a habitual matrix of awareness, that has been perfected in meditation.
3. When you have achieved unification of mind and single-pointed concentration in meditation, you will be experiencing powerful, perfectly focused attention (i.e. directed and sustained attention) coupled with equally powerful introspective awareness of the ongoing state and activities of your own mind (i.e. mindfulness with clear comprehension). These are jhana factors, and are naturally accompanied by the other jhana factors of joy and happiness. They transfer quite readily to daily life, although obviously without the same intensity as in meditation. The result in daily life is not only powerful mindfulness, but happiness, tranquility, and equanimity.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/jhana_insight/conversations/topics/3008
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Re: Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы
« Ответ #9 : 14:52 26 Октября 2016 »

In the earliest stages of samatha practice, the awakening to the fact that the mind has wandered is a distinct conscious event from the engaging with the object by the wandering attention. When one knows the mind has wandered, the thought it had wandered to is already gone. Likewise, the moments of ‘checking in’ with introspective awareness in the middle stages of samatha practice are distinct conscious events from the ongoing observation of the meditation object, and as such are actually interruptions of the attention to the meditation object (although if they are brief enough the interruption may not be especially noticieable). On the other hand, with upacara samadhi the sati-sampajanna can be simultaneous with the sati directed at the meditation object. How is this possible? In the early stages of practice, the energy level of the mind is not high enough that the mind has enough ‘bandwidth’ to encompass both at once. But in the later stages, as sati becomes more and more highly developed in tandem with attentional stability, conscious awareness can be focused on the mind while the mind attends to the meditation object, not as two separate objects, but as one object (the mind) that includes the other (the sensations of the breath). This is experienced as a change in perspective, as a ‘stepping back’, as an expanded scope of single pinted awareness. It is the opposite of what one does in order to enter jhana, which is also a change in perspective but is a ‘sinking in’ instead.

http://dharmatreasure.org/on-mindful-awareness-vs-dullness/
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Re: Методика джханы досточтимого Аюкусалы
« Ответ #10 : 15:26 26 Октября 2016 »

So while it is futile to try to suppress normal mental activities, we can certainly condition the mind so as to determine which specific activities predominate under certain circumstances. We can also condition specific mental activities so that they respond more readily to volitional intention. And through appropriate conditioning we can even modify various mental activities themselves in beneficial ways. Recognizing this, we discover the secrets of training the mind, which is to say the conditioning of the mind:

1. Always employ positive reinforcement of those inherent, natural tendencies of the mind that serve us in our practice.

2. Never employ negative reinforcement in an attempt to overcome the completely normal, ordinary, and otherwise useful activities of mind that obstruct our practice.

An example of (1) is feeling pleased and genuinely appreciating the quality of the introspective awareness, that precious taste of satisampajanna, that spontaneously arises to make us aware that the mind has been wandering. Never feeling annoyed or somehow trying to ‘punish’ the mind for having wandered is an application of (2).

3. Only use positive reinforcement of their non-occurrence to inhibit those otherwise normal mental activities that are problematic in meditation.

There is a natural sense of satisfaction and success when the mind doesn’t become lost in some random thought process. Enjoy it without surrendering to its negative counterpart, which is dissatisfaction when the mind does become lost in distraction. Whenever the attention begins to stabilize and the mind remains in the present, there is always a sense of calm, contentment, and happiness associated with it, but it is not such a strong feeling that it can’t be overlooked, and too often it is overlooked. These are the “mild feelings of joy and peace” that you mentioned having noticed in the earlier stages of meditation. Make sure that you do always notice them. Savor them.

4. There is no Self in control of the mind!

The mind is a collective that operates partly through consensus and partly through the very temporary dominance of one mental process over others. There is no “you” who is the boss of your mind. One part of your mind might wear the big hat marked with the letter “I” for a short period of time, but it has no inherent power to sustain that role. Inevitably, some other mental process operating with a different agenda and from different conditioning takes over and becomes the “I”. This is one of the things meditation teaches us from the very beginning, if we only know to notice. If the part of the mind that is exercising a dominant role pushes too hard, it is displaced from dominance by some other part of the mind. Ultimately, meditation is about training a complex, multi-part mind to operate cooperatively, coherently and consistently, with shared consensus and common goals.

5. Cultivate contentment, happiness, and joy at every opportunity in your meditation, and by every wholesome means outside of meditation as well, and then bring that joy into your meditation.

To whatever degree that the many, many mental processes making us up are functioning in harmony, there will naturally be some degree of joy and happiness. The converse of this is that to whatever degree any of those mental processes are out of harmony, agitated, or resistant to whatever is happening in the moment, that joy will be diminished. At some point the joy and happiness is completely gone, and there is only agitation, restlessness and aversion due to the internal conflicts of the mind.

The more joy and happiness is present, the greater the tendency for these different mental processes to come into synchrony and harmonize with each other. This is the basis for the state of flow that has been studied rather extensively by psychologist Czikzentmyhalyi. This also the basis for the feedback loop you mentioned where aversions and restlessness are diminished while joy is increased. And you are quite correct in identifying this as being the same feedback loop employed by Leigh Brasington for entering the ‘lite’ jhanas. Pleasure brings a state of joy, the state of joy is then more conducive to experiencing further pleasure, which then brings more joy, and so on.

In meditation, the collective that is mind creates the causes and conditions for its own internal harmony and happiness. No part of the collective is really opposed to that as a result, but there is a lot of internal confusion about how to get from here to there. Ultimately, the only way that the part of the mind that recognizes meditation practice as the best way is going to convince the part of the mind that believes having a beer and watching TV (or spending money or getting drunk or having sex, etc) is the best way, is through repeated, successful demonstration.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/jhana_insight/conversations/topics/2618
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